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Covid-19: Common cold may give some protection against disease, new study suggests

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Natural defences against a common cold could offer some protection against Covid-19, too, a new research has suggested.

The study performed on a small scale and published in Nature Communications by Imperial College London, involved 52 individuals who lived with someone who had just caught Covid-19.

Those who had developed a “memory bank” of specific immune cells after a cold – to help prevent future attacks – appeared less likely to get Covid while those who had not recovered from a cold were more likely to catch covid.

But scientists say no-one should rely on this defence alone, and vaccines are the surest way to prevent the virus.

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Covid-19 is caused by a type of coronavirus, and some colds are caused by other coronaviruses – so scientists have wondered whether immunity against one might help with the other.

But the experts caution that it would be a “grave mistake” to think that anyone who had recently had a cold was automatically protected against Covid-19 – as not all are caused by coronaviruses.

The Imperial College London team wanted to understand better why some people catch Covid after being exposed to the virus and others do not.

Their study focused on a crucial part of the body’ s immune system – T-cells.

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Some of these T-cells kill any cells infected by a specific threat – for example, a cold virus.

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And, once the cold has gone, some T-cells remain in the body as a memory bank, ready to mount a defence when they next encounter the virus.

In September 2020, researchers studied 52 people who had not yet been vaccinated but who lived with people who had just tested positive for Covid-19.

Half the group went on to get Covid during the 28-day study period and half did not.

A third of the people who did not catch Covid were found to have high levels of specific memory T-cells in their blood.

These were likely to have been created when the body had been infected with another closely-related human coronavirus – most frequently, a common cold, they say.

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Researchers accept other variables – such as ventilation and how infectious their household contact was – would have an impact on whether people caught the virus, too.

Professor Ajit Lalvani, senior author of the study, agreed vaccines were key to protection.

“Learning from what the body does right could help inform the design of new vaccines.”

“Current vaccines specifically target spike proteins that sit on the outside of the virus, but those spike proteins can change with new variants.”

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